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the most important person in my life in my work environment where i spend a lot of time. at that point, a couple things happened. that happened. my mother was sick with lung cancer and, you know, i think i just made the decision. i wasn't repaired to make that sacrifice anymore and started to think about if i did this and did it in a certain way, would i have the opportunity to make a contribution to the dialogue on sexuality and especially male professional sports. >> no doubt there are active nba players who are gay. at some point, at what point will they feel good enough to come out? >> that's the big question, isn't it? i don't know. you know, i think it will be amazingly courageous when somebody decides to take that step. these are very young people with not a lot of life experience beyond basketball. it will happen but predicting when is a difficult thing to do. >> have you spoken to any of them and what advice or conversation -- >> no, that's -- i talked to a lot of people. i'm not going to talk about who i have spoken to. i think everyone, it's such a personal journey. it was f
of exchanges going on right now. forward to a post 2013 environment, to you believe these multibillion-dollar payments will continue regardless of their being an american presence or nato troop presence in afghanistan? maintaineve we need to a constructive and effective relationship with pakistan. we need to recognize the real threat that pakistan has inside of its own borders. from my perspective we have to do whatever it takes to ensure that our national vital interests is protected. >> one of the things i am always looking into that aid is whether or not it does serve the military. you are saying we need to do whatever it takes to continue that relationship. are you saying that payments of that size and nature are going to be what is required in the long run? >> i believe it is in our best interest to continue to develop the pakistani army in ensuring that they can effectively deal issues in their borders. i cannot tell you that every program we have in place is one we ought to assisting in the future. that is not something i paying particular attention to in my current duties. i am
environment. in my previous discussions with general allan, it is obvious the right level is closer to the 352,0020. that the 2013 and 2014 fighting seasons are critical to setting conditions for success and i worry that inadequate funding will erode the fighting capability of our troops on the front line. president's budget proposal last week has to address the unprecedented resource challenges facing our military and will hurt the readiness of our military. to preserve our place, the navy is tying up carrier strike groups. the air force is surrounding aircraft. the effect of this deteriorating readiness will be felt by the fighting forces in 2014, by the men and women we sent into combat next year. the president's must get serious about working with the congress on a lasting solution to the challenges facing our military. the troops fighting for this nation deserve nothing less. i think you very much -- i thank you very much. >> thank you. welcome. >> good morning distinguished members of the committee. i appreciate the opportunity to represent the men and women of the u.s. forces of the afg
environment, but aided dramatically by all the video that has been made available. >> i think that's right. i think this is going to raise a debate long term in america like the debates we had on gun control in the wake of events that were so tragic in the past year or so. people are initially going to say, hey, look at the advantage you get in this 21st century environment where you have surveillance cameras everywhere. an environment that the europeans, by the way, are way ahead of us on. a lot more surveillance in europe than there is here. i suspect over the course of a month or two or three months americans will step back and say, hey, that might have aided that investigation but we're not sure we want to live in that kind of security culture. >> and we can't draw, phil, any hard conclusions about one of these bombs was in a pressure cooker. that's obviously available very easily. you can't draw any conclusions whether that's a signature of a domestic or a foreign terrorist. >> actually, i would draw conclusions. but more about what it's not than what it is. when you look at the people i
. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations' with kroll and humane degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. law and international treaty obligations this conclusion is and based upon our own personal impressions, but rather grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes the torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees and many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constituting torture. but you look at the united states state department and its annual country reports
may also be a constraining factor. living in a bad home environment can be a big distraction. budget cuts is probably the worst problem of all. >> scheduled cuts that would take place unless congress acts would mean 8.2% cuts. >> cut. >> yes, cut. and these aren't just dollar signs in percent. they are children's futures. >> programs are designed to pick up the slack for kids whose needs aren't being met. all of those programs are designed to deliver needs of children not being met by the larger system. to cut seven point eight percent would have an incredible impact on students across america. >> before we fix the educational system, we need to find out what meets [indiscernible] >> we do have room for improvement. one of the areas that we are weak in is allowing students the opportunity to be creative in their learning and for us to decided relevance for students. with the advent of technologies, students don't teachers foreed information. they can go to the internet and get answers. but what they do need teachers for his what information is relevant? what information is accurate?
. the whole idea of the urban environment derailed, but the plans put forward for the park and for the national park. the same state and federal officials of the philadelphians are dealing with for the u.n. proposal were the ones who also were going to sign off on the part. this interesting connections there certainly. >> charlene, just being aware of time is here, but to continue the dialogue. i'd like to thank her again for her presentation. [applause] >> where the conservative book local action conference in washington d.c. with author paul kengor of "the communist." who was frank marshall davis? >> frank marshall davis was born in kansas 1905, died and made you and 87. ended up in chicago and ultimately honolulu and that's where he would meet a young man named barack obama in the 70s. he was introduced by obama's grandfather, stanley dunham. i should back up a little bit. he was african-american. he was a republican from the time of lincoln to fdr. remarkably what so far to the left that during world war ii he joined the communist party. he joined communist party u.s.a.
from criticism that it ignored the threat he environment in benghazi. we're back with the panel. it goes on kirsten. >> what difference does it makes a secretary clinton would say democrats are claiming political hit job by the republicans and frequently these things do get politicized but i would say the democrats were welcomed to be part of this, i'm sure and nobody is stopping them from investigating benghazi and they embarrassed themselves during the hearings, spending the whomentd time trying to make up stories for why the administration dropped the ball on this. so, one of the most interesting things in this is that secretary clinton, when she was testifying, said that she was not aware that nothing came to her attention in terms of security for the embassy and, in fact, it turns out that it did. and her exact words were i made it very clear the security cables did not come to my attention or above the assistant secretary level. well it did go above the assistant secretary level. it wally actually went to her office. weather she saw it or not is a different question it def
environment, we are warriors as opposed to common criminals who should be should be investigated and based on that investigation prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law? many people have made grandiose claims about wanting to be in a war. how that ends up getting decided is based on facts on the ground. it is based on law and facts not on suppositions or on the grandiose claims of people who would like to be bigger than they are. >> host: him ma shamsi with the aclu, american civil libertis. and cliff may, foundation for defense of democracies. he writes a weekly column distributed by scripps howard news service and contributes to nationalreview.online, townhall.com among other publications a lot of folks want to talk to you. let's get back to the lines. charles, wood bridge, virginia, republican, go ahead. >> caller: thanks. you know i am a republican and i am an american obviously and i, my stance is that, i believe -- [inaudible] >> host: charles, we're losing you right as we get. >> caller: i'm sorry. >> host: say it again? >> caller: thank you, i'm sorry. i believe that the admini
's something that would have to be part of an agreement and acceptable to republicans in this environment, it is something we can defend on a technical basis. it's more accurate and because for middle class people, you know, it's a burden that is relatively small. the most vulnerable even $10 a month for the most vulnerable is a big deal. if you live to be 90 years old and all you have is the social security, that $10 can be the difference between food in the last couple of days of the month. so i think we have to distinguish between what impact going a more correct measure would have. and we have, you know, put in a way that we think is fair. by saying that the most vulnerable have the benefit go up. not because we have the overall adjustment being faster. we will make the decision to go in and make sure they're not hurt. >> thank you. >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for appearing. i have four sets of questions i'm going run through quickly. supplementally. first thing has to do with the crap i look at the budget. how it's crurkted. because the choice of the underpinnings of the a
easy. it is challenging in this fiscal environment. administrations 39 budget -- $39 million budget request. consistent with what congress appropriated in 2013 for the department before sequestration cuts were applied. the level of funding in this budget is lower than what congress appropriated in 2009. stepping back and thinking of the challenges that our country and this department has faced since 2009, times square bombing, hurricane sandy, the ever-changing and growing cyber threat, and of the boston attack, it is easy to become concerned with this budget request. we are facing extremely difficult budgetary times. sacrifices must be made. they may not receive all of the funding. and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required during this deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. he is identified $1.3 billion in savings this year and more than $4 billion since 2009. he continues to move from a risk-based approach and it effort to save more money. i'm happy to see this budget proposes a much-needed increase for cybersecurity,
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
, but in this environment, the one thing i would ask for is more latitude in how we take the cut to fit the money with the most important payoff is. with respect to the question you raised, it is an age-old one and intelligence. the approach or try to take in the last two years is try to protect and invest in capabilities that give us the most general coverage. that's why a very strong on sustaining our overhead reconnaissance capability because it covers the earth, denied area or not and similarly, even when times are then, human capability is extremely important. that's when the hu what dr. vickers are io brilliae as much as it is a reshaping, recastg he organization i started in 1992 caughhet t defense humanrvice. better integration with the fbi and the cia. more clandestine case officer's who are worth their weight in gold. the unique capability no one else can render. as they make reductions, we have to focus much much more on quality, quality of investment since are not going to have in numbers. >> one quick question that's come up a number of times. and there is clear evidence, public evid
carbon pollution in the environment than we have in nearly 20 years, but we understand this is not enough. we've got to do better, and that's why we've got to pursue an all of the above numbering strategy that includes investing in more biofuels and more fuel efficient vehicles and more solar and wind power and more people going back to work building cars and homes and businesses that are more energy efficient than the ones we've got right now. that's why i've proposed new job-creating investments in science and innovation. and all these young people, as young as they are, they're all going to be going to college, and a lot of them are going to want to continue to pursue tear research and pursue their dreams. and if there is not the research grant pipeline in place, many of them will not have the resources to invent and discover the things that will make us healthier and make us more energy efficient and improve the quality of our lives. so this is not the time to gut investments that keep our businesses on the cutting edge. that keep our economy humming, that improving, you know, the qua
of the techniques used against detainees in u.s. custody in a post-9/11 environment, the state department has characterized the same treatment as torture, abuse or cruel treatment when those techniques were applied by foreign governments. the cia recognized this in an internal review and acknowledged that many of the interrogation techniques it employed were inconsistent with the public policy positions the united states has taken regarding human rights. the united states is understandably subject to criticism when it criticizes another nation for engaging in torture and then justifies the same conduct under national security arguments. there are those that defend the techniques like waterboarding, stress positions and sleep deprivation because there was the office of legal counsel which issued a decision approving of their use because they defined them as not being torture. those opinions have since been repudiated by legal experts and the olc itself. and even in its opinion it relied not only on a very narrow legal definition of torture, but also on factual representations about how the tec
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

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